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  • Fourth UN Global Road Safety Week 8th-14th May 2017

    We are delighted that the theme of the week will be Save LIves - SLow Down

  • A New Yorker's view of our campaign

    Watch the video created by StreetFilms in their recent visit to the UK. It won the "Favourite StreetFilm of 2015 Award!"

  • Is your village blighted by 30mph limits?

    See why 20's Plenty for Villages

  • TfL Start Roll-out of 20mph Arterials

    One of the first roads to get a 20mph limit is Commercial St in Tower Hamlets. Go to our latest London briefing

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Already over 15m people live in local authorities which are adopting or have adopted this policy. Most importantly, through democratic debate those communities have decided that "20's Plenty Where People Live". And it is those same communities who have then changed their behaviour to drive slower in residential streets and where people walk and cycle.

20's Plenty for Us is a 'not for profit' organisation and now have nearly 400 local campaigns around the country and many of our most iconic cities in the UK have already adopted a 20mph limit for most of their streets.

We quite simply campaign for 20mph to become the default speed limit on residential and urban streets. This can be done on most streets without the need for any physical calming and we accept that on some streets it may be appropriate to have a higher limit based on the road, vulnerable road users provision, etc. But any limit above 20mph should be a considered decision based on local circumstances.

If you are viewing this page then you have found our new website with which we will be building a resource for campaigners and people implementing 20mph limits as well. And it here that you can set up an account and sign in to get updates, etc. You can sign in with your Facebook, Twitter or Email.

We won't have everything up available initially, so please also take a look at our legacy site at www.20splentyforus.org.uk if there is any further info or, contact us

Rod King MBE

Founder & Campaign Director

 

 

  • Latest from the blog

    Lessons to learn from Manchester

    In a recent analysis of its 20mph roll-out Manchester City Council have decided to review it plans because pedestrian and cycle casualty reduction in the first Phase implemented in 2012 have not matched the %age reduction in all the roads across the city. They are continuing their roll-out of Phase 2 but may use some of the allocated funding for Phase 3 on alternative road treatments. Some of the media and 20mph opponents have used this as "proof" that 20mph limits "don't work" and are calling for other cities to "learn from Manchester" and change their 20mph plans. At 20's Plenty we take the view that all evidence is useful evidence but needs to be put into context to understand how relevant it is. In the case of the statistics quoted by Manchester there is considerable doubt as to whether they can tell us anything positive or negative, but may point to things which Manchester needs to do better in its 20mph roll out. We list the main flaws and what may be learnt from them.
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    Wiltshire Council misinforms public on 20mph zones outside schools

    People in Wiltshire could think that their council is being progressive by its plans to allow schools to request a 20mph zone outside their school. Whilst in its press release it says :- "We want to balance the needs of local people with the need to ensure children can travel to and from school safely, and I think this is a great way to do that" and in its web news release actually shows a picture of a mandatory 20mph zone (you can tell its mandatory because it uses a red circle) but what we have confirmed with them is that it is actually only offering is an advisory temporary  limit which any driver with knowledge of the highway code knows is not mandatory. In fact the actual speed limit on the road remains at 30mph. We call upon Wiltshire council to stop misinforming its parents and children about its intentions and what they can request.
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  • Latest from the blog

    Norwich and West Dunbartonshire Councils vote for Default 20mph

    Norwich and West Dunbartonshire Councils have voted for a 20mph default speed limit. 20’s Plenty for Us is delighted to add them to the growing list of 50+ places adopting 20mph. 20mph protects everyone from avoidable harm by reducing road risk and increasing air quality and exercise levels. 17m people live in places committed to 20mph.
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    Manchester Found Casualties Falling in its 20mph Areas

    Manchester reported on their first 20mph limits. It resolved to complete Phase 2 of the 20 mph programme, continue supporting phases 1 and 2 of the 20mph scheme and monitor and review data to increase its understanding. It incorrectly compared % falls for small number samples in already safer than average areas versus citywide.  
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  • Latest from the blog

    20mph Signage Regulation Changes

    Signing 20mph speed limits has become easier and dramatically cheaper. Repeater signs are now optional. Half the terminal (start/end of limit) signs are required. A minimally signed scheme stipulates 70% fewer capital items. Total costs fall by 40%. Cost per head falls from £2.50 to £1.50
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    Casualty and Physical Inactivity Costs

    DfT have a calculation which assesses the costs of fatal, serious and non-serious casualties. We have linked the 2015 casualty stats for each local authority to this formula so that you can see the cost for your area.Public Health England also make an assessment of the costs of physical inactivity. Based on your authority's population we can show this for your area. We have also shown an approximate one-off cost of implementing 20mph limits across the authority based on the typical £3 per head of population. This is then shown as a percentage of the total annual casualty and physical inactivity costs. Whilst it is accepted that this is an approximation and may vary according the distribution of population it does show that put against the annual casualties and physical inactivity costs, the one-off cost of 20mph limits is minimal and typically less than 1%. These calculations are available in a spreadsheet which you can download here. Once downloaded then after "allowing editing" simply select the blue cell and then use the drop-down box to select your authority.  
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